Friday Five: 5 Ways To Cope With Injuries

 

When I got the news that I’d have to painfully (pun intended, lol) get through 6 weeks of no running, I made the decision that I was going to go all the way–I was going to listen to my doctor and do what I had to do to make sure I came back healthier and recovered. No cheating, no small runs to get the crazies out, none of that.

So, here are five ways I was able to make that happen:

1.) Surround Yourself With People Who Work Out

I know this sounds awful for someone who’s injured. Why would you want to see brag stories from people doing what you want to do? But let me tell you, for me, it was motivation. I wanted to do what they were doing and I wanted to do it well. Sure, I could bust out a 5 miler if I wanted to, but I knew I’d pay for it later in some way and the goal is to be able to do this for a long time, right? Eye on the prize.

I kept up with blogs as best as one can during the holidays and it was actually fun to see my friends’ successes on Instagram/Facebook/etc. I cheered them on, congratulated, lamented with the ones who didn’t do well, and I still felt connected to the running world.

I lived vicariously through my friends who continued working out and knew I had to make sure I could keep up when I did return to running.

Which meant…

2.) Do What You Can!

For us, running is everything. Nothing can really replace our one true love but when it’s on a hiatus (i.e taking a break), we have to resort to back-ups.

I threw myself in what I could do and at the beginning it wasn’t much. I didn’t even know how to do it!

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The first two weeks of my injury, all my doctor wanted me to do was swim. He wanted zero impact on my legs. Well, I didn’t know how to swim but I have friends who do and luckily, they were patient enough to teach me how. I’m still learning, lol!

I swam when I could, and I focused on upper body strength and my core. All things that would help me when I returned to running (and really, things I should’ve been doing anyway).

After I was cleared, I took on spinning, something I’d always been curious about but never did because, well, running.

I took classes at my gym, again, something I would never do because I’d always choose running over anything else. But the core classes, the spinning classes, the stretching classes all were helping me stay in shape and helping me become a better runner–for when I was ready.

Keeping busy really helped make the time go by faster. I wrote down on my calendar the classes I’d take, what days I would elliptical/bike/swim, and before I knew it, my weeks were full of activities. I was pretty much working out 5 days a week!

3.) Shop!

Retail therapy. Best.

I definitely used some of my injury time to scour through running websites, lol! I found a really neat new (local!) running/clothing company on Instagram called Senita Athletics and fell in love with their stuff. I decided to splurge on myself with some new purple pants. I had them visible for me in my closet to remind myself the day would soon come when I could wear them 🙂

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purple pants ❤

4.) Find A Way To Use Race Entries

At the end of the day, I was only out 1 race (of four). I was able to move down from the Hot Chocolate 15k to the 5k and walked it with friends, and I downgraded from Phoenix Marathon to the 1/2.

I transferred my Fiesta Bowl 1/2 Marathon bib to a friend and she ended up using it to help pace Runner Jenny to a PR!

Rock and Roll Arizona 1/2 Marathon was my only loss.

Walking the Hot Chocolate 5k ended up being so much fun as I had friends who were walking anyway (even if I hadn’t been injured) so I didn’t feel like I was slowing them down. We chatted the entire way and before I knew it, it was over–and I was sad! 🙂

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I think we had fun.

Fiesta Bowl 1/2 Marathon was supposed to be my goal 1/2 and I was a little sad to not be able to run it–BUT, I knew that I was not in PR shape and I probably would’ve been more devastated not meeting my goal.

It certainly helped that my husband snagged a PR  and that my bib was used to help my BRF snag one as well 🙂

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My champ.

It’s tough for us to see expensive races go to waste so finding a way to still make it work for you–or for a friend–really helps alleviate the loss.

5.) Know That The Day WILL Come

I had it marked on my calendar with balloons and confetti.

It’s important to know that that day will happen IF you follow doctor’s orders. Do not do things to prolong that date.

Every time I went for check-ups I’d ask how everything was progressing and my doctor would say the magic words, “You’re right on track!”

And the day DID come! Exactly 6 weeks from when I was told no running.

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November 28th to Jan 11th=6 weeks.

Of course, now it’s crucial I respect the return process as much as I did the recovery. That’s  #6 and I’ll report on how well that works out another time 😉

Hope these tips help! Happy, healthy recovery! ❤ , helly

–What tips would you give runners coping with injuries?

Thanks for hosting the Friday Five Mar, Cynthia, and Courtney!! ❤ (P.S you guys, I get to meet Mar this weekend!!!!!)

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No Running–Week 6: I CAN RUN!!!

Longest six weeks ever.

Not really, but almost. I just can’t believe I went 6 loooong weeks without running! Thank goodness that’s over with–well, technically after my appointment today (Monday). You better believe I’m lacing up tonight! (Slowly, of course)

Anyway, I hadn’t recapped my last two weeks mainly because I’ve kept myself quite busy 😀

Week 5:
Monday-Core video
Tuesday-25 min bike, 60 sec plank (side ones too!)
Wednesday-25 min elliptical, 20 min bike, 60 sec plank
Thursday-7 miles on the bike, 60 sec plank
Friday-Arms video, 60 sec plank
Sat/Sun-60 sec plank

Week 6:
Monday-Core video, 30 min elliptical, 60 sec plank
Tuesday– 60 min w/ personal trainer
Wednesday-55 min spin class, glutes, 60 sec plank
Thursday-45 min swim, arms, 60 sec plank
Friday-45 min elliptical, 60 sec plank
Sat/Sun– 60 sec plank

Whew! I’ve definitely been using my newfound SAHM status to get to the gym. Luckily, my kids have adapted well to their “gym school” 😀

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After I get the all clear, it’ll be all about slowly getting back into running shape. I’ve done my best to keep my cardio up and cross train so that the transition isn’t impossible. I’d like to be 13.1 ready for Phoenix 1/2 Marathon, which is over a month away. I’m not expecting PR miracles there, but I’d still like to do relatively well.

So happy to be back on track. Thank you guys so much for sticking with me on my running hiatus! Quite a few people have told me that I’ve done well getting my workout on despite not being able to run and the truth is, I just love working out. I love sweating. I love hearing my heart beat fast. I love the feeling of fatigue from a hard workout. It’s one of those things you either ‘get’ or you don’t. I love that you guys do ❤

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–Tips for getting back into the running game?

–How was your running experience after an injury? 

Mid-Week Musings: How Running Changes Lives

Hi all! Happy middle of the week! 🙂

So, I’m in several running related groups online and in my community, and often times there are people who share their stories of what got them into running.

I love hearing these stories. 

On one outlet, a man gave his testimony on how he was a recovered drug addict who had often lived on the streets and been in and out of jail and rehab for most of his life. It was in his most recent stint in prison where he picked up running and decided that when he got out, he’d run a 5k.

And he did.

He acquired a new addiction in running and found support (unsurprisingly) in the running community. Later on, he found himself in unfamiliar territory, on the first place podium. He found he was actually pretty good at this running thing.

The support in the online forum where he shared his story was so positive and it just made me thankful that there are places for people to go to get help, inspiration, motivation, positivity. With so much bad stuff happening in our world, it’s comforting knowing there’s hope around us despite it.

I had recently read in June’s edition of Runner’s World magazine an article where the author spent some time with prisoners in Oregon. The prison holds monthly seasonal runs and an annual half marathon for the inmates and it has become a cherished day for them. For many, it is all that they have to look forward to. For others, it’s what helps them become better people when they leave. (This is an online article in RW–different than the printable, and this is a separate article specific to the Oregon prison runs.)

As I’ve coincidently read several pieces related to this topic lately, I’ve learned that there’s quite a few places where people who are in positions of need can get help. There’s an awesome website called Racing for Recovery where people with addictions or recovering from one can get help and use running as a form of positive rehabilitation.

I’ve mentioned the I Run 4 program where miles are run for those who can’t. I think this is also a great way to help recover by helping others when those with addictions think they can help no one, as is often the case.

A simple search on google “race for recovery” brought up several pages of races devoted to the cause. There’s something about running for a cause you can really relate to that is extremely motivating and gratifying.

I’m a daughter of an addict. And while my dad is in a much better place in his life now, the choices he made early on influenced his relationships with people in his life, career paths he could’ve taken.

There’s help out there–on the pavement, on the trails, on the track.

Sometimes it is okay to run away from something.

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I hope everyone has a great rest of the week! Friday is closer than you think 🙂 ❤ , helly

–Do you know someone who could benefit from programs like the ones I mentioned? 

–What other programs do you know of that people who need help could benefit from?